Jen Loves The Web

Stuff found while browsing the internet and other things too.
Who I Follow

sandandglass:

Bryan Stevenson on The Daily Show.

(via racialicious)

thefreshprinceofkansas:

cornerof5thandvermouth:

petitepasserine:

the-hairy-heterophobe:

ablogforemily:

shamelesslyunladylike:

the-hairy-heterophobe:

if anybody asks me why i hate men, i’m just gonna redirect them to this post.

it’s pretty fucking obvious that men only want to invest in breast cancer research to further degrade, objectify, and jerk off to body parts they already feel 100% entitled to. that’s what is at stake for them. 

what about the women whose “tatas” weren’t saved? how must they feel being surrounded by awareness ads that focus more on keeping women’s sexy-sexy-titties-to-continue-titillating-the-males than saving real life human beings and helping survivors? 

If anyone’s wondering, those posts came from here. It’s a forum for breast cancer support. Give it a read, and you’ll see how many women are outright abandoned by their husbands, sometimes after being married for decades, because their “tatas” couldn’t be saved.

This culture of “save the tatas” even goes as far as the doctor’s offices themselves. Most doctors request that the husband be present during surgical consultations, as though he has an equal say in the patient-professional discussion.

If the woman is single, as was my case, doctors have actually recommended postponing surgery until she finds a relationship, because “it could be nearly impossible to find someone who accepts it [your unnatural tatas] in years to come”. 

I’m 15 months post-mastectomy, and the date I had this past week was the first time since then that a guy hadn’t reacted negatively to my scars. The relief was so overwhelming that I was fighting back tears. When I told him —essentially warning him that my body wasn’t what he must be expecting — I felt so guilty; it seemed to have the same weight and shame as telling someone I had some sort of an incurable STI or a felony record.

I shouldn’t have felt that way. I should not be ashamed of choosing to live. 

Thank you for your important commentary! I hope you find someone who can love you for who you are and admire your strength as a survivor.

holy shit this just makes me so immensely disgusted and i actually feel sick to the core??? just. holy shit.

when my mother was getting a surgery consult for the lumpectomy, the surgeon actually insisted i was in the room with her and kept asking my opinion ABOUT MY MOTHER’S BOOB even though we were both visibly uncomfortable with the situation

i mean for fuck’s sake i’m her son, that’s a: awkward as hell and b: it’s just a fucking TIT, who cares if it “looks good” as long as she fucking LIVES, jesus god damn christ, why is it that doctors think a man has to sign off on a fucking tit???

fucking infuriating

anyhow fuck “save the tatas” campaigns

Fuck this shit. Nothing on this planet pisses me off more. Fuck. This. Shit. 

According to the “save the tatas” campaign, my mom lost the battle to breast cancer when she had her double mastectomy. Instead, I’ve had nine more years with the best mother on the planet. That’s nine years of phone calls, attending my cross country meets and musicals, Say Yes to the Dress marathons, and the best spaghetti on the planet. And you’re telling me that those nine years meant nothing because she didn’t have her breasts?! FUCK. YOU.

My dad has been a rock for the family though everything. He supported my mom through the double mastectomy, chemo, radiation, hair loss, chemo, more hair loss, again and again. My mom’s dyed her hair when she had it and bought wigs when she didn’t, and he always tells her how beautiful she looks to him. My mom has gone through hell and a half, but my dad has done his small part to make her feel as comfortable in her skin as possible.

THAT SHOULDN’T BE THE EXCEPTION. 

My dad has always been my hero, but it shouldn’t be revolutionary for a husband to value their wife, not their breasts. 

Anyone who disagrees can fuck off. 

(via rubyvroom)

Screw writing “strong” women. (x)

I want to get to this point.

(via racialicious)

bitch-media:

Nevada Assemblywoman Lucy Flores is running to become the first Latina Lieutenant Governor of her state.  She’s no billionaire’s wife, no Ivy League prodigy, no daughter of some ruling-class family from Latin America.  Lucy Flores grew up poor in a family of 13 children. A daughter of immigrants, she dropped out of high school, got involved in gangs and spent time incarcerated. She saw all her sisters become teen mothers and didn’t want that for herself. When she became pregnant at 16, she had an abortion that she doesn’t regret.

She eventually turned her life around. She went to college and later law school. Yet she doesn’t twist her success into a bootstraps narrative of a self-made woman. Instead, she acknowledges all the support she got along the way.  She bears witness to the fact that it was the chance generosity of individuals, and not a reliable safety net in our society that made the difference. Her own lived experience becomes the basis of her progressive agenda for social change.

Lucy Flores defies the politics of respectability. She’s single, childless, honest about her sexual past, and fierce in her advocacy for poor and marginalized people.  She takes bold stands on immigration, education, and domestic violence. Her experience makes her an effective advocate, but it also makes her a new kind of role model for Latina women.  Like Justice Sonia Sotomayor before her, we are watching a smart, single, childless Latina rise from poverty to political authority.  But Flores’ background not only includes the “humble beginnings” of poverty, but the stigmatizing experiences that can accompany poverty, like jail, dropping out, and unplanned pregnancy. 

Read more of Aya de Leon’s article about Lucy Flores on Bitch Media

(via racialicious)